I’m the islander

I’ll be brief, it is damn good to be back on the island. Anadromous fish and their stream resident brethren are doing pretty shitty over here, and that really hurts, because this island is a special place. It’s also home, and I’m back, in the comox valley this time, and I ain’t leaving unless you chain me to the ferry to hell(tsawassen)

There are many things to reflect on after a year of living on the mainland, and working in the tackle industry.

1. The tackle industry is a poisonous farce, manned by a bunch of “guides” and “professionals” who if left to their own devices are going to destroy every last fishery that exists on earth.

Buy whatever you can afford and be happy with it, only human waste look down on others because of the cost of their tackle, Farbanks and all the other purveyors of high dollar cool can all go suck a bag of dicks. I have never felt less interested in fishing in my life than the time I worked in this industry.

2. The island is a special place, the vedder river, not so much.

3. I am still going to keep this catastrophe of a blog going, if only to piss off idiots and entertain my ambitions to be a Walmart level fly tier, and more importantly because fish like the coastal cutthroat are magnificent creatures deserving of our awe and reverence.

There are still some signs of life in some streams here (the water in this stream stays cold, don’t worry)


Cohen: you can’t make a dead horse more dead

In the faint chance you maybe hadn’t heard of the Cohen commission, (put together by the prince of darkness himself in 2009 in response to one of the poorest sockeye returns to the Fraser on record and then subsequently ignored for the rest of the conservative party’s mighty reign) here it is:


Since the release of the report in late 2012, the federal government has done little to act on any part of the panels recommendations. But wait!

Justin Trudeau has come to save the day, so now the D.F.O has announced that now they are going to act on all of the recommendations that they had been steadfastly ignoring for the past three and a half-ish years.

Here is a report card for the governments response so far to the 75 recommendations made by the Cohen commission


Here is the federal Liberal government’s 2016 statement of intent (and other info) to follow the reports recommendations


The reason I include all these long documents full of words and shit is for 2 reasons:

  1. Many fisherman are ignorant as pie about conservation or salmonids in general, and really need to learn how to read and interpret information and then join together as opposed to what they mostly have been doing, which is bickering about long rods versus short rods, or making feeble, racist and incomprehensible rants.
  2. I want to feel important.

While I want to believe in the intent of the D.F.O as an entity to save wild pacific salmon like I want to believe in The X-Files or clean Russian athletes, I do believe that the D.F.O has many members who as individuals want to help pacific salmon and somewhere in there some of them will be empowered to do the good work they are there to do as opposed to being bullied for it.

This is the first real acknowledgement I have seen in years by the department that pacific salmonids are not doing all that well.

Breaking News:

Pacific salmonids are not doing very well across much of their range and most stakeholders are only trying to take a bigger cut of a diminishing pie as opposed to acknowledging their own part in that decline. Looking at you and me!

The Cohen recommendations if implemented will have a much broader impact than just Fraser river sockeye salmon.

That to me is significant.

Then again they refused to acknowledge any impact or conflict of interest in their co-management of coastal fish farms and wild salmon, and the recently departed fisheries minister was carrying on a la Rob Ford’s (rest his soul) mayoral cluster fuck in Toronto so take it for what it’s worth.


Cumberland fly shop

Small fly shops are all too few these days, and it’s a tough market even during good economic times(unlike now) but I’m happy to pass on that there is a new fly shop located in the comox region, more specifically the village of Cumberland.


Pop in next time your on the way up island, Peter and the rest of the crew are stand up guys, and the inventory is growing fast. Do yourself a favour, skip Cabelas and stop in at a real fly shop on your way to wherever on this little slice of paradise known as Vancouver island….and stop in at the microbrewery while your at it.

Back from the dead


While no one misses the ranty, crass, opinionated, grammatical catastrophe that this blog may well be, I thought my fellow cutthroat aficionados might appreciate the link, as well as anybody who might be curious about the magnificent coastal cutthroat.

The state of anadromous fish stocks on the west coast of North America is many things but without involvement of anglers, armchair scientists (or real scientists for that matter) concerned citizens, and the general public things would assuredly be worse than they are now (as bad as that may be) so please, get involved.


the reanimated corpse of cutthroagalore


It seems people get caught up these days in a lot of the revisionist, messy imperialistic and racist parts of the past especially for some reason on rememberance day. Those debates do not change the reality of the sacrifices made. Please remember today the reality that those people who fought and died or fought and came back scarred and in many cases broken weren’t there to drop bombs on little kids or uphold some imperialistic notion of border lines on a map. Just a thought.

Lest we forget

Cynical bastards

It seems to my jaded and somewhat dulled senses that there is a feeling in the air of malaise in the fisheries conservation world in BC. Now I know I’m a total manic depressive when it comes to these things but it ain’t just me and my shitty blog.

The grinding attrition of the simply massive amount of megaprojects that are steamrolling all common sense and opposition throughout this province, many of which directly affect salmonids, is simply overwhelming on all fronts. The Thompson steelhead run sucked this year even without blame being focused on a particular angling group or their methods, and the DFO is allowing reckless chum netting regardless of impact. With that it seems now that the regs have changed but nothing is different there is a feeling of deflated angst, as if we’re reaching the point of feeling as if bitching about these fish is getting old. The drought of doom passed us by this summer leaving us with fisheries made almost non existent, die offs, and a great deal of uncertainty facing the future of many other fisheries. Returning steelhead and coho are generally smaller in size than normal, with poor returns in many places, generally thought to be an effect of the much warmer temperatures this region of the world has been experiencing. (See the big warm shitty blob of water in the North Pacific). Top that off with the Canadian election where, while Harper is out (party on Wayne!), what we have instead is a great unknown. I know we feel powerless in the onslaught of such things, but I appeal in the most broad terms… In no fucking way are we powerless!

Right now a whole bunch of new MPs from BC are about to descend on Ottawa. Now is the time to let them know what you expect from them in terms of management of our fisheries, coast, and ecosystems at large and how the economy bisects those things. Fish conservation is not pretty, sexy, or even rewarding, but if we are to continue to enjoy what we have today it is vital and necessary.

Write letters/emails/tweets/facebook posts/blogs/newspaper articles, meet people, form groups, make effort and noise, get dirty and don’t give up.

On that note a stream that is very dear to me in our very own lower mainland is under threat from yet another development that, once again does not follow a sustainable or reasoned approach to urban creek management, but instead seeks to bludgeon monetary avarice on the community with zero recompense to the reality of that place. As ever we here at cutthroatsgalore give that idea the single finger salute and encourage you to do the same.

http://www.sfgc.ca       watch the video



please take the time to sign the petition:


The salmonids and wildlife of the small but productive Little Campbell river in South Surrey have survived many onslaughts over the years (look up the Campbell Heights industrial park development, or what gravel extraction had done to this pretty little stream) thanks in part to the hard work of the Semiahmoo Fish and Game Club and many other groups and neighbours in the area over a significant length of time. I agree that trucks need to go somewhere, but it certainly ain’t here. This area has been under a sustained non stop campaign of thoughtless development by a bunch of cheese dick councillors, developers and get rich quick wankers who care nothing for this place or the people who have dedicated significant portions of their time and lives to preserving this stream. I don’t support the dick richards, ski jump hair cut wastes of space that are behind this project, and I don’t appreciate it when they fuck with my shit.

While there are many big picture conservation battles to be fought, developments like this one (I’m sure there are many other battles occurring in countless communities around the world) are a good place to start getting involved. Please consider spreading the message that this is not an acceptable location for this development and that wild salmonids are and should be at least as important as anything else when it comes to land management.



It seems my days in southern Vancouver island have come to an end. Unforseen events otherwise known as life have converged to send me back to the Fraser valley, which happens to be where a bunch of my old stomping grounds are located. So while Vancouver island topics will definitely fall by the wayside, there are many more conservation related rants and BC flyfishing topics to come including kayak fishing, and mainland cutthroating amongst others.

In the interest of keeping things honest unlike so so many things in the world of fly fishing, I now work at a tackle shop in the Fraser valley. Just to clarify previous to this I have never worked or received any monies for anything to do with fishing, and while this blog has zero relation to or influence from my employer a little honesty is required relative to publishing tackle reviews and the like.

I hope this doesn’t cloud your judgement of this blog which continues as ever to celebrate the amazing salmonids of this coast and flyfishing in the most honest way I know how.

Vote motherfucker!

Don’t believe in the system? This is reality, not dungeons and dragons. When you let apathy take the wheel and let a party who got themselves a majority because only 20 odd percent of the country actually voted for them and then allowing them to “run” the country as a purely cynical and completely autocratic exercise in message management, at the cost of the very things they claim to represent including the economy, you put everyone else in this entire diverse and great country over a barrel. Canada is so very much more than the picture the conservative spin machine is trying to paint it over with so stop acting like a 16 year old girl and involve yourself in this thing called democracy. Please fucking vote. Please.



We are having a motherfucker of a drought here in BC, (and Montana, Washington, Oregon, California, Mars, etc.)

*warning, the following is the same info you’ve probably read somewhere else, written in a more cogent and grammatically correct way, so in the interests of not creating more pointless internet noise for you tune out skip to the last paragraph.*

This is resulting in rather unprecendented low stream flows/high water temperatures/ and in some cases low in stream dissolved oxygen, and fish mortality. Thankfully regulatory bodies whose usual body of work appears to rarely cross into the realm of competency have been forced by a great deal of noisy conservation groups to implement stream closures across BC and much of the western U.S. This by proxy is forcing many anglers (who in some cases have been forced against their will to consider their impact) to focus on the “ethical” water temperature range to practice catch and release fishing for salmonids and char.

Now look this isn’t the first bad drought in the history of salmonids, nor is it the last, these fish by and large are very hardy and have adapted to their environment, but ask yourself, in these days of such grim returns in so many places do you really want to kill or harm them for catch and release fishing?

A typical range that is stated by many anglers to stop fishing for salmon steelhead and trout is 65 degrees Fahrenheit or roughly 18.3 degrees celcius. My suggestion is to:

a) Do some homework on the tolerable temperature ranges of the fish you are targeting and the effect of lactic acid buildup in the body of a fish while being “played”.

b) Follow that as a basic guideline, keeping in mind that in some places there are springs, weirs, dams, salt water influx, deep pools/ cover etc. that can create a difference between surface temps and stream bed temps but that is highly variable between locations or even within the same system…and if you start thinking that you might want to stretch it then you probably shouldn’t be fishing, in warm temps it is very easy to play a fish to death even if they swim away.

c) On a nice hot day ( like 30 degrees celcius say) try out my warm water salmonid catch and release simulator. Go up in your attic, sit for an hour and then do a bunch of push-ups and see how you feel. *warning: may induce cardiac arrest, heat stroke, nausea, vomiting, exhaustion, hyperventilation, headaches, dizziness, fainting, incapacitating muscle cramps, and or death*

Here’s a few guidelines on what you can do to minimize your effect on salmon, steelhead, trout and char in these high stress conditions:

Consider that if you have to ask the question, you probably shouldn’t be fishing. As stewards of our fisheries (and all anglers are) survival of the fish you love should trump your good time. If you still must fish it is imperative for their survival that you play them very very quickly.

Carry a thermometer, they are cheap and easy to find, measure water temperature before you fish, do some homework before you leave the house.


There are tons of other fisheries out there so go and explore, find places where water temperatures are lower, find species that are more hardy, for example on South Island we have many fine smallmouth bass fisheries, largemouth bass, vile invasive perch in several lakes (and Colquitz creek) deep cold water trout in every big lake, sunfish and carp in most south Island systems, lingcod, rock cod, flounder etc. etc. etc. as well as saltwater salmon fisheries like pink salmon and Chinook (water temps are usually fine here). Every one of these species will readily take a fly and fight hard. A 3 lb smallmouth on a 5 weight is a lot of fun (see below) and they readily take surface flies too.


Forget about all this “Is it still ethical if” BS and take a page from Lee Spencer who has dedicated his life to protecting Oregon’s North Umpqua river summer steelhead whose canyon pooling behaviour at steamboat creek leaves them vulnerable. He also fishes with hookless flies.


Where is Vancouver island’s Lee Spencer? We have just as many storied summer steelhead runs who remain just as vulnerable in specific key over summering canyon pools, and yet the only people you usually find there are poachers or clueless anglers. There are so many examples out there of stranded low water Chinook and summer Steelhead who are mercilessly and endlessly harassed by anglers. Three or four months from now, this drought is going to be the last thing on everyone’s minds yet every single one of the issues will still remain. How about you figure out a way to step up and protect your resource instead of blaming the weather, natives, the lack of 22. ammo or whatever other garbage is clouding the collective minds of anglers these days.